Standard Bearer

I wanted to add something with a sort of fantasy battle bent to my portfolio. The concept was a warrior carrying a standard or banner behind which an army could rally and charge. Initially, I intended to work in watercolor and then make some digital enhancements. Justin Gerard is a great example of an illustrator who often works this way. Justin’s work has a sort of whimsy that I wasn’t really looking for, though, and I made the mistake of also looking at some fully digital work from Blizzard projects and things like that. I started covering more and more of the watercolor underpainitng with digital, but still trying to leave some of the texture showing through. The result was turning into a horrible hybrid that did no justice to any of the styles, or concepts that inspired it.

This is one of those instances where I hesitate to share some of the images from this process. But, since I make fun of people on social media who only share the best parts of their life, and only the most flattering photos of themselves, here goes.

First up the Drawing and watercolor underpainting.

Underpainting and drawing for Standard Bearer painting

Next is my first pass of digital “enhancement”. At this point I was realizing that I hadn’t done my drawing and underpainting large enough and with enough detail to leave this much of it showing.

First pass digital

I started adding more and more digital color etc. But I wasn’t willing to go full opaque digital, I was still trying to keep texture and color from the underpainting—I was also having a hard time forcing myself to zoom in and get the details right.

Failed attempt at digital painting standard Bearer

Like I said it all turned into a frustratingly horrible hybrid that made me wonder how I ever thought I could make art. I then decided to give it one last try. I would go back to the physical watercolor painting, seal it, and paint the whole thing in oils. There were definitely some draw-backs to this. The texture of the paper wasn’t may favorite, and I was limited by the original scale. But, at least it was a medium that sort of makes sense to me.

First sections of Standard Bearer painting in oil

I immediately felt a little better when I put down the stylus and picked up a paintbrush.

Oil painting of Standard Bearer charging into battle. By Jameson Gardner

Like I said, texture and scale were limiting, but I feel like this is 147 times better than my digital attempts. I learned some important things from the experience. First, pick a style and stick with it (at least for the course of one painting). Next, if you want to do all Justin Gerard you need to draw and paint at a scale where you can get all the detail. If you want to go all Blizzardy you need to be willing to go full out opaque digital. I’m not giving up on that either, I’ve been practicing my digital painting skills and have already produced some studies that are more appealing than where this project was going. Maybe I’ll post one of those next.

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Watercolor Girl in Armor

I just wanted to draw something the other day. So, I found some reference of a face and did a little drawing.  Just plain faces are great, but I have a tendency to want to add swords, bows or laser cannons to a lot of the things I draw. So, I put this girl in a suit of armor. I liked it. and I decided to watercolor it.

Watercolor painting of girl in armor by Jameson Gardner Art.

Luckily, I had done the drawing on Arches 88 a fairly hefty printmaking paper. Unluckily, I hadn’t done it on watercolor paper. I did scan it and try printing the drawing onto watercolor paper. It worked fine, but the only watercolor paper I had laying around was some of that cheap stuff that you buy in a pad at the craft store. I don’t believe that more expensive is always better… but in this case it is. Cheap watercolor paper has this weird artificial tooth that feels like it has been stamped on.

I opted to just try painting on the original drawing. I tested the corner of the paper first, and I’m glad I did. it sucked up the water and pigment like a rookie camel at his first oasis. This printmaking paper has no sizing (the stuff they put in paper that makes it less absorbent) and that wasn’t going to work for me. I ended up coating the paper in acrylic matte medium, which rendered it significantly less absorbent. I did the coloring with Acryla gouache handled watercolor-style. You can do all the same kinds of washes, but it won’t lift of bleed once it dries.


Preliminary drawing for watercolor painting of woman in armor by Jameson Gardner Art.

Drawing for watercolor painting of woman in armor by Jameson Gardner Art.

I tried to design armor that would look elegant, but functional. We have a surplus of  warrior women wearing armor or outfits that reveal all but the most vital areas and protect none of the vital organs. This is my take on Women’s armor.

Progress shot watercolor painting of woman in armor by Jameson Gardner Art.

All in all, I was relatively pleased.

 

 

Watercolor Girl in Dress

watercolored ink drawing of girl in medieval/ renaissance dress.

Yes, “Watercolor Girl in Dress” is a pretty lame title. But, it describes what I’m talking about.
I just finished this ink/watercolor project. This image was born from a combination of my love for the work of Arthur Rackham, which makes me want to do watercolored pen/ink, and the fact that my sister owns a cool medieval/renaissancey dress.
I started by shooting reference photos of my sister in the dress. We just tried different poses and I decided which to use later.

I would include the photos here, but I haven’t asked her permission to show them—they look a lot like the drawing, only more photographic.

Work in progress shot of drawing girl in medieval/renaissance dress

Using the photos for reference, and having found a hairdo on pinterest that I liked, I made a pencil drawing on watercolor paper (Arches).

Work in progress shot of drawing girl in medieval/renaissance dress

I inked the drawing with a Pentel brush pen (I like the thin black pocket version best). I used to use a nib pen for stuff like this, but you can get really great lines and variety with these pens without having to dip or clean.

Work in progress shot of watercolor girl in medieval/renaissance dress

For the next stage I use watercolor techniques, but with acrylic gouache. The result is very watercoloresque but once it’s dry, the acrylic polymer sets and it won’t run if you rewet it. As you can see, I forgot to stretch my paper before I started painting. It buckled quite a bit and I had to soak and dry to flatten it when I was done painting.

Work in progress shot of watercolor girl in medieval/renaissance dress almost finished.

finished ink and watercolor drawing painting of girl in medieval/renaissance dress.

Once finished painting I photographed it because my scanner is tiny, and overlaid a some handmade textures using photoshop.

I suppose I could just paint my textures right on the paper, but I like to be able to play around with the layers until I find how they work best. I also like to preserve the original the way it is.

Hope you enjoy. I’ll be selling prints on Etsy.